W3CSS Theme - Vivid Colors Library

By drupalhero |

CSS and HTML When HTML was first created, style properties were defined directly in the code. However, rather than just adding more and more tags to HTML, the W3C introduced Cascading Style Sheets to fill the design void in straight HTML, allowing the Web to become semantic in structure. For example. In HTML, the strong tag does one thing and one thing only: It makes text “stronger,” usually by making it bolder. However, using CSS, you can “redefine” the tag so that it not only makes text bolder, but also displays text in all caps and in a particular font to add more emphasis.

W3CSS Theme - US Highway Colors Library

By drupalhero |

Hex or Decimal? Until recently, it was assumed that colors should always be declared in RGB hexadecimal notation. In fact, I still meet designers and developers who are completely unaware that they have alternatives. RGB decimal has been around for quite awhile and will work in any browser you want to throw it at. But which is “better”? I personally find that it’s much easier to envision a color in decimal numbers (which I’ve used all my life) than in hex values. I can look at the value 135, 127, 107 and know it’s a reddish beige much faster than if I see 877f6b.

W3CSS Theme - W3CSS References

By drupalhero |

How does CSS work? When a visitor loads one of your Web pages, by either typing in the address or clicking a link, the server (the computer that stores the Web page) sends the HTML file to the visitor’s computer along with any files linked to or embedded in the HTML file. Regardless of where the CSS code is, the visitor’s browser will interpret it and apply it to the HTML to render the Web page using that browser’s particular rendering engine that is then displayed in the browser window.

W3CSS Theme - European Signal Colors Library

By drupalhero |

With the advent of laser and inkjet printers, we seem to be buried under mounds of perfectly printed paper. Even the Web seems to have increased the amount of paper we use. If an article on the Web is longer than a couple of scrolls, many people print it. But the Web was created to display information on the screen, not on paper. Web graphics look blocky when printed, and straight HTML lacks much in the way of layout controls. That said, you can take steps to improve the appearance of printed Web pages.

W3CSS Theme - Camouflage Colors Library

By drupalhero |

Types of CSS Rules The best thing about cascading style sheets is that they are amazingly simple to set up. They don’t require plug-ins or fancy software—just text files with rules in them. A CSS rule defines what the HTML should look like and how it should behave in the browser window. CSS rules come in three types, each with specific uses: -HTML selector. The text portion of an HTML tag is called the selector. For example, h1 is the selector for the tag. The HTML selector is used in a CSS rule to redefine how the tag displays. -Class.

W3CSS Theme - Default Background Color

By drupalhero |

The ability to set the background color on an HTML page has been around almost since the first Web browsers. However, with CSS you can define the background color, not only for the entire page, but also for individual elements using the background- color property. Unlike the color property, though, background colors are applied only to the element, and are not directly inherited by its children. That said, by the very fact they are within the parent, they will be set against that background. To define the background color of an element: 1.